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One of the character traits of high achievers is their desire to commit to lifelong education including reading books.

We’ve compiled a list of some of the late, Steve Jobs (co-founder of Apple) favorite books.

Steve Jobs reading list 

1. ‘Only the Paranoid Survive’ by Andrew S. Grove Click here 

“This book is about one super-important concept. You must learn about Strategic Inflection Points, because sooner or later you are going to live through one.” – Steve Job 

Description

Under Andy Grove’s leadership, Intel has become the world’s largest chip maker and one of the most admired companies in the world. In Only the Paranoid Survive, Grove reveals his strategy of focusing on a new way of measuring the nightmare moment every leader dreads–when massive change occurs and a company must, virtually overnight, adapt or fall by the wayside. – Source 

2. ‘Atlas shrugged’ by Ayn Rand Click here 

“Steve was very fast thinking and wanted to do things, I wanted to build things. I think Atlas Shrugged was one of his guides in life.” – Steve Wozniak 

Set in a near-future U.S.A. whose economy is collapsing as a result of the mysterious disappearance of leading innovators and industrialists, this novel presents an astounding panorama of human life-from the productive genius who becomes a worthless playboy…to the great steel industrialist who does not know that he is working for his own destruction…to the philosopher who becomes a pirate…to the woman who runs a transcontinental railroad…to the lowest track worker in her train tunnels. – Source 

3. ‘Moby Dick’ by Herman Melvile Click here 

“Jobs told me that “Moby-Dick” was among his favorite books and he reread it a lot when he was a teen.” – Walter Isaacson

So begins Herman Melville’s masterpiece, one of the greatest works of imagination in literary history. As Ishmael is drawn into Captain Ahab’s obsessive quest to slay the white whale Moby-Dick, he finds himself engaged in a metaphysical struggle between good and evil. More than just a novel of adventure, more than a paean to whaling lore and legend, Moby-Dick is a haunting social commentary, populated by some of the most enduring characters in literature; the crew of the Pequod, from stern, Quaker First Mate Starbuck, to the tattooed Polynesian harpooner Queequeg, are a vision of the world in microcosm, the pinnacle of Melville’s lifelong meditation on America. Written with wonderfully redemptive humor, Moby-Dick is a profound, poetic inquiry into character, faith, and the nature of perception.Click here 

4. ‘The Innovator’s Dilemma’ by Clayton M. ChristensenClick here 

“Jobs was deeply influenced by the book The Innovator’s Dilemma.” – Walter Isaacson

Christensen explains why most companies miss out on new waves of innovation. No matter the industry, he says, a successful company with established products will get pushed aside unless managers know how and when to abandon traditional business practices.

Offering both successes and failures from leading companies as a guide, The Innovator’s Dilemma gives you a set of rules for capitalizing on the phenomenon of disruptive innovation. – Source 

 5. ‘King Lear’ by William Shakespeare – Click here

'King Lear' by William Shakespeare

“and I started to read more outside of just science and technology — Shakespeare, Plato. I loved ‘King Lear.” – Steve Jobs 

The play tells us about families struggling between greed and cruelty, on the one hand, and support and consolation, on the other. Emotions are extreme, magnified to gigantic proportions. We also see old age portrayed in all its vulnerability, pride, and, perhaps, wisdom—one reason this most devastating of Shakespeare’s tragedies is also perhaps his most moving. – Source 

Sources: Favobooks.com / Businessinsider.com
George B

Posted by George B

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